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Leura Bypass. New South Wales. Australia

Client
Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA)
Sector
Transport
Services
Engineering ExpertiseInfrastructure Construction
Value
$32 million
Duration
2004 - 2006

Leura Bypass. New South Wales. Australia

Leura Bypass. New South Wales. Australia

Leura Bypass. New South Wales. Australia

Leura Bypass. New South Wales. Australia

Full project details

Laing O’Rourke widened the existing two-lane highway between Willow Park Avenue and Kings Road, Leura, to a four-lane divided highway improving traffic flows and making local roads safer.

This challenging project widened a two-lane section of the Great Western Highway to a four-lane divided highway, redirecting almost 30,000 vehicles per day while under construction.

The project’s centrepiece was a precast super-tee girder bridge structure – 137m long – constructed using a top-down methodology to create the underpass. The new highway section went under a busy local road that provided access to the nearby Leura Mall. Further along the project’s footprint, a pedestrian overpass bridge was extended to create a safe crossing location. 

To make way for the bridge structure, and deliver the new four lane highway, a mammoth 94,000 billion cubic-metres of soil was excavated, with more than half being disposed safely offsite.

The physical challenges of the project included steep surrounding terrain, sandstone underlying material and close proximity to the Blue Mountains National Park which has significant native vegetation and environmentally sensitive areas.

The Great Western Highway is the main arterial road through the Blue Mountains. Significant and well planned traffic management, with multiple traffic switches, ensured minimal disruption to commuters and created a safe working environment for Laing O’Rourke’s team.


Project facts

A 137m long precast super-tee girder bridge structure grade separated the new highway from a major local arterial road.

94,000 billion cubic-metres of soil was excavated to make way for the new four lane highway.

Traffic management was critical to ensure minimal disruption to almost 30,000 vehicles that used the highway each and every day.